2018 Book Unhaul #1

0000HelloDragonlings!

Today I have my first unhaul of the year. I have a bunch of books I’m going to be getting rid of. Most will be going to my library (even if they don’t take donations, they have a free shelf where people can put books).

There will be several more throughout the year because I am completely out of shelf space and I need to figure out what to do about it. (There is *a lot* of stuff in my house.)

Using a different camera and a different editing software than usual and noticed after both filming and editing this footage 3x that the mouth movements and the sound aren’t matching up with one another. I don’t know why and I don’t know how to fix it… yet. I’ve got to play around with a few settings to see if I can fix that in the future.

0000ThanksDragonlings!

“5,000 Words Per Hour” by Chris Fox Review

Disclaimer: I read the ebook version of this book.

5,000 Words Per Hour: Write Faster, Write Smarter5,000 Words Per Hour: Write Faster, Write Smarter by Chris Fox
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

An interesting concept for writing and adding to one’s writing, and something I wouldn’t mind attempting. There is heavy emphasis on using an app the author created to make this plan work, but that app is only available to iPhone and Mac users (Apple products) rather than Android and Windows users, which is kind of depressing, but he did provide a spreadsheet that can follow the same process, so it’s not as bad as it could be.

Second Read-Through
I enjoyed this book a little more this time around. I think the only reason I dislike it actually are mentioned in my original review above.

Sometimes, re-reading a book can be a good thing. Both times I read straight through without doing the exercises laid out in the book, but it doesn’t matter if you do them at the end of the book or as you read along. The point is to do them. I don’t remember doing all of them the first time I read this book, but I did see the value in most of them. This time, I completed each of the exercises and I found more value in the book overall. It also helps that I’ve started tracking my word counts in more months than just NaNo months, so I’ve seen the results of what Fox discusses in this book and how I’ve improved over time.

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“A Fox’s Love” by Brandon Varnell Review

Disclaimer: I read the ebook version of this book.

A Fox's Love (American Kitsune #1)A Fox’s Love by Brandon Varnell
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I’ll preface this by saying that I’ve never read an anime novelization, although I watch a lot of anime and read a lot of manga. That said, I really got the anime vibe from this book and there were a lot of anime tropes in here that were recognizable and fun. Random nose-geysers and fainting at the sight of nakedness being one of them.

The story itself is lighthearted (for the most part) and fun.

Kevin is a decent kid, although I didn’t really understand why, throughout the entire book, which took place over the course of a week or two, he didn’t contact his mother. She was out of town, but I can’t remember what she was doing (working, that much I know) or why he never once called her. Teenagers. *shrug* What can you do? Still, I loved his character, although there were plenty of times I felt he made situations worse by not being completely truthful with Lilian from the beginning. A lot of problems might have been prevented if he’d just talked to her. Again, teenagers. What can you do?

Lilian was funny, albeit clingy. She’s super cute, and I love how she doesn’t care what other’s think. In a way, she’s innocent and naive, but in others, she’s completely manipulative and mysterious. I like that we got to see both sides of her. I’m interested to see how she develops in future books. I like her right now, but I don’t like how much trouble she causes Kevin or how he doesn’t really do anything to stop it. Their relationship is… strange…

There were several side characters that didn’t get as much screen-time that I hope we see in future books, because I do plan on reading more of these. I’m not to keen on Kevin’s best friend. I didn’t mind him being pervy, but he was a lot worse once he met Lilian, although I’m starting to wonder if he wasn’t just affected by her being a kitsune more than anything else.

There was a lot of fourth-wall breaking, but I didn’t see much of it until about halfway through the book. Lilian was the one breaking it, and she doesn’t talk right away, but there were several moments, reflecting back upon some of the first scenes she appeared in and spoke, where it would have been great to break it. I didn’t notice her breaking the fourth wall until much later than when it *could* have started. The moments where it did happen were great though and I thoroughly enjoyed them.

Overall, I liked this book and can’t wait to read the next in the series. I’m interested to see what happens next between these two not-so-crazy-about-each-other (at least on Kevin’s end) lovebirds.

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My Bookish Valentine Blog Hop: A Book with a Heart of a Cover

A BOOKISH BLOG HOP.png

0000HelloDragonlings!

I’m participating in another blog hop, but this time, it’s Valentine’s Day themed! Once you read this post, check out some of the others listed below. Enjoy!

Name a book with a heart on the cover.

Honestly, the first book that comes to mind is probably not the typical idea for this. The reason? It has a heart on the cover, an anatomical one. It’s called Hearts & Other Body Parts by Ira Bloom, and is a YA paranormal romance book following the romances of three high school sisters who also happen to be witches.

JoLinsdellJo Linsdell

I’m going to pick The Defrosting of Charlotte Small by Annabel Giles. I love this cover. This was a book I picked up based solely on the cover, and it didn’t disappoint. You can watch my video review of the book here:

About the book: Single mother Charlotte Small’s life is falling apart…After flattening a friend’s dog, carelessly losing not one job but three, and waving her daughter off to spend Christmas overseas, Charlotte hits the wall. Years of suppressed heartbreak and disappointment overwhelm her and the fine thread of sanity finally snaps. Consequently, having thrown the entire contents of her house onto the street, she’s found by the police, lying on her back under a Christmas tree with an empty bottle of Port and a half-eaten lump of Stilton. Charlotte needs to claw her way back from the brink and start again. But can she build a bigger, brighter, and better existence this time around? The Defrosting of Charlotte Small is wonderfully observed and genuinely funny, mining the glorious seam of black humour that is fast becoming Annabel Giles’ trademark.

Casia SchreyerCasia Schreyer

The first one that sprang to mind was Taking Flight: An Intimate Journal of Self-Awareness by Marianne Curtis. There’s a few special things about this book – first, it’s a follow up to her best-selling memoir Finding Gloria and second, she’s just released the cover of this brand new project. The expected release date is May 1, 2018.

HeartCovers

My Bookish Valentine Pinterest

7th: Jo Linsdell
8th: Virginia Jennings
9th: Casia Schreyer
10th: Casia Schreyer
11th: Skye Hegyes
12th: Skye Hegyes
13th: William James
14th: Virginia Jennings

0000ThanksDragonlings!

My Bookish Valentine Blog Hop: Your Fictional Crush

A BOOKISH BLOG HOP.png

0000HelloDragonlings!

I’m participating in another blog hop, but this time, it’s Valentine’s Day themed! Once you read this post, check out some of the others listed below. Enjoy!

Who is your fictional crush?

Oh! This is a tough one. Well, I think my first fictional crush was actually with a horse, as I fell in love with Black from The Black Stallion by Walter Farley, but since then, my love has shifted to the devilishly dark and handsome man known as Tarik from Legend by Jude Deveraux.

JoLinsdellJo Linsdell

This is a tough one. Given the amount of books I’ve read, there are loads of characters I could put as the answer to this one. I’m going to go with one that always comes to mind though… Mr. Darcy. What’s not to like about Mr. Darcy? So what if he’s a bit socially awkward. I imagine him with that refined look from Regency Era England. So romantic! He’s wants the perfect partner and is not interested in settling for less. He’s rich too, which although is a very shallow reason, means he could take good care of me. Oh and we could drink tea together… I’m a Brit. I love proper English tea 😉

vljauthorpic
V.L. Jennings

I guess I’m going first… I’ll confess… My fictional crushes are Almanzo Wilder (Little House on The Prairie)- he knows how to romance a girl! And Gilbert Blythe (Anne of Green Gables)- he knows how to wait on a girl- all while still playfully getting on her nerves 😉

My Bookish Valentine Pinterest

7th: Jo Linsdell
8th: Virginia Jennings
9th: Casia Schreyer
10th: Casia Schreyer
11th: Skye Hegyes
12th: Skye Hegyes
13th: William James
14th: Virginia Jennings

0000ThanksDragonlings!

“The Graveyard Book” by Neil Gaiman Review

Disclaimer: I borrowed this audiobook from the library.

The Graveyard BookThe Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I listened to the audiobook, which I’d checked out from my local library.

In a way, this novel felt like a collection of short stories all featuring the same characters at different points of Bod’s (Yes, Bod. Short for Nobody Owens) life. That’s not overly a bad thing, but it was certainly different. I felt as if each chapter was meant to be its own story and that “The Graveyard Book” was just an omnibus collection of those short stories. It was certainly a different way of writing.

I found myself disliking most of the characters. They weren’t badly written. Quite the opposite. Each character was fleshed out in its own way so that you had a clear image of their personalities and their traits. They just weren’t the greatest people in the world. With some of them, those who were dead and stuck in the times they had lived in, it didn’t bother me as much, but those who were living – such as Scarlet (Gods, I hated Scarlet the most actually, even more-so than the bullies honestly) did because they weren’t good people. I did like Silas (for the most part) and Bod, but there were a couple things near the end of the novel I can’t reveal without spoilers that annoyed me about both.

Overall, I liked the story. I liked how the sections of Bod’s life all tied together, how each new character that was introduced impacted his life. It was wonderful storytelling. What I liked the best was how each of the chapters seemed to start with something that seemed to have no correlation with Bod and his life, but it would all be tied back to it in the end. Especially the discussion of ghoul gates. That was my favorite chapter because it started talking about how every graveyard has a ghoul gate and what to look out for, and as I sat there listening, I couldn’t help but wonder why there would be a mention of ghoul gates. However, Bod had a short adventure dealing with ghoul gates in which he discovered what they were and how they operated, but on top of that, he was able to use that knowledge near the end of the book (again, I can’t reveal more without spoilers).

This story was Bod’s story. Mainly. There were several “interludes” where we got glimpses into the lives of some of the other characters (Silas, Scarlet, and Jack), but overall it was Bod’s tale. That being said, it would have been interesting to know more about what Silas is/was and the Honour Guard. It would have been interesting to learn more about the Jacks of All Trades and their organization.

This is a good book following the life of a boy who grows up in a graveyard and those surrounding him, who (for the most part) are all dead. Neil Gaiman is a master at weaving a story that you feel compelled to read even if you don’t like the characters in the story (Gods… Friggin’ Scarlet…). If you like Neil Gaiman, you should read this book. And if you like audiobooks, I highly recommend listening to it. It’s read by Neil Gaiman and it’s perfection to listen to.

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